The Maltese Islands , one of the most charming destinations in the Mediterranean , offer the traveller a unique holiday experience.

Blessed with year-round sunshine and set in crystal clear waters, Malta and its sister islands of Gozo and Comino, can be a fascinating setting for a truly memorable vacation. The islands’numerous cultural, artistic and natural treasures are there to be discovered and are all within easy access from wherever one chooses to stay.

Malta’ s outstanding archaeological and architectural heritage will act as an impressive backdrop to all of one’s activities – a living testimony of 6,000 years of civilization. The legacy of the various dominations who ruled over the islands throughout the ages can be seen, felt and savoured.

Whether one seeks action or relaxation, tranquility or excitement, one can find it in Malta . For lovers of music, theatre and the arts, Malta boasts an abundant calendar of cultural manifestations and events. For the sportive visitor, the islands offer golf, tennis, sky-diving, horse-riding, and unlimited possibilities for water-sports – from sailing to windsurfing and the best scuba diving in the Mediterranean .

Malta is a feast for the senses: delicious local cuisine and wines, bustling open air markets, traditional fireworks extravaganzas, delicate lace and multicoloured glassware, the thrills of the casino… All of this and more awaits the fortunate traveller who decides that it’s time to say: It’s Malta !

The Maltese Islands enjoy a healthy climate, with mild winters and a hot summer season. Cold winds, snow, frost and fog are unknown. Rain falls between September and April. It seldom rains after April, and nearly never in summertime.

The temperature averages 57.5 degrees Fahrenheit in winter (Nov-Apr) and 89.6 degrees Fahrenheit during the summer (May-Oct). The hottest period is from mid-July through mid-September although the islands seldom get too hot, as hot summer days and nights are regularly tempered by cool sea breezes.

There are no mountains or rivers. The majority of fields are small and terraced, but despite lack of rain and other adverse terrain conditions, agriculture is well developed.

The Maltese archipelago consists of three islands: Malta , Gozo and Comino. Malta , the largest island, is 237 sq. kms in area; Gozo is 68 sq. kms and Comino, 2 sq. kms.

The population numbers circa 370,000. Of these, 28,000 live in Gozo. Comino is only inhabited by a few farmers. Because of their strategic position, Malta and Gozo have been inhabited for the past 7,000 years. The two islands have a long and varied prehistoric period: Neolithic, Copper and Bronze age civilizations lasted more than 4,000 years; one can still admire vestiges of those remote times in form of impressive stone temples, a unique hypogeum and remains of skilful handicrafts.

The first known people to settle in Malta were the Phoenicians, who reached these shores on their trading ventures in the 9th century BC. They were succeeded by their Punic kinsmen, the Carthaginians, who were eventually conquered by the Romans in the 3rd century BC. The Romans governed these islands until the division of the Roman Empire in the 4th century AD.